Saturday, September 29, 2012

Update: Scrum Metrics for Hyperproductive Teams


The Scrum Metrics for Hyperproductive Teams: How They Fly Like Figher Aircraft will be presented at the IEEE HICSS Conference in Maui in January. A preliminary copy is available online at the link above.

Previously, OpenView Venture Partners videotaped the Scrum metrics presentation that Scott Downey and I presented at Agile 2010. It consists of an animated slide presentation and an Excel spreadsheet that supports RoboCoach, the automated tool for generating a retrospective on your Scrum.

In the presentation, we fine tune the backlog and the Scrum meetings to help create a culture of hyperproductivity. High performing teams are constantly removing impediments. As they go faster and faster the impediments become smaller and smaller, yet constant attention to removing them is critical. Failure to do this is similar to failure of the flight control computer in a high performance jet aircraft. It is always making slight adjustments to keep the aircraft stable. If the computer fails, the plane will spin out of control.

The metrics here are simple to collect and detailed in their capability to assess the stability of a team. For the first time we have comparable metrics across Scrum teams which are useful for identifying opportunities for coaching and improvement.

Videos of the Agile 2010 presentation can be found here. The latest RoboCoach spreadsheet can always be found on rapidscrum.com. The version of the presentation prepared for Openview can be downloaded here.

7 comments:

Ron said...

Pure Awesomeness!

Yogesh Kumar, CSM, CSP, PMP said...

Simply Awesome. I wish I could hear voice too but presentation was self explanatory full of great ideas. Thanks for sharing!

Stefan Roock said...

Very nice presentation!

Timo Mulder said...

It is awesome indeed :)

One question I had is how you track the storypoints teams already finish each day on a specific story before it is done. My current team finds it too much micro management and difficult to give an estimate.

Any thoughts?

Jef said...

@Timo: Don't track partly done stories. A story is either done or not done, so you credit the story points only when it is completely finished.

Mark said...

@Timo - during the Daily Scrum, ask the team to discuss their collective contribution one SBI at a time...for each SBI, have them estimate their collective contribution's complexity in Story Points for each SBI...add them all up and you will have your daily burn.

Mark said...

@Timo - during the Daily Scrum, ask the team to discuss their collective contribution one SBI at a time...for each SBI, have them estimate their collective contribution's complexity in Story Points for each SBI...add them all up and you will have your daily burn.