Saturday, June 05, 2010

Most Important Thing to Remember: 50% of what you think is wrong!

Taichi Ono teaches that 50% of what you think is wrong. The robot researchers in artificial intelligence figured this out twenty years ago as well. They had understand this to get the robots to work. Study after study on college campuses show that students get simple physics questions wrong about 50% of the time.

I got clear on this in 1988. I started working hard on studying which half of my brain was stupid. That's why we have Scrum.

We knew much earlier than this that 50% of what is published in the New England Journal of Medicine (the bible of conventional medicine) is proven wrong in the same journal within five years.

We have a financial disaster that cost most of us 1/3 of our retirement plan because people get incentive bonuses and this time they brought down the whole financial system. Study after study at MIT and around the world show that incentive bonuses cause people to perform worse if they have to do any thinking in their job. (Hopefully, that is most of us.)

Of course, all the research shows performance appraisals demotivate people but we still hand out performance appraisals thinking that will help employees improve performance proving that much of what we think and do is fundamentally flawed.

Always remember half of what you think is wrong and the most important thing you can do every day when you get out of bed is to systematically investigate which half of what you think is wrong. You can start today by watching this video.

4 comments:

Mario Mol said...

Most of companies should see this.
The problem is that almost all of them haven't a way back, cause it is already a culture on the organization.

Maurice said...

What amazes me is that more companies don't get it. The research has been around awhile, it's compelling, and it works. Yet I know I'm in for a battle every time I go to bat for team reviews/rewards vs. individual reviews/rewards.

Tony said...

Very interesting. What about a hybrid model which lets teams be self managing and organizing. Allows people to work on things they find interesting and lead new initiatives. Then rewards the team for success. This is what I always thought would work best but can not get companies to agree to the first part of the equation, the most important part!

Tony said...

Very interesting. What about a hybrid model which lets teams be self managing and organizing. Allows people to work on things they find interesting and lead new initiatives. Then rewards the team for success. This is what I always thought would work best but can not get companies to agree to the first part of the equation, the most important part!