Saturday, April 17, 2010

Excel Spreadsheet for Hyperproductive Scrum Teams - very cool!



Scrum Metrics for Hyperproductive Teams: How They Fly Like Fighter Aircraft

Jeff Sutherland and Scott Downey
Agile 2010 Experience Report

Scrum teams use lightweight metrics like story points, the burndown chart, and team velocity. The inventor of Scrum was a fighter pilot and used the burndown chart to help teams land a sprint properly. Recent work with hyperproductive teams shows they are like modern jet fighters in two ways. They have engines that produce velocity—alignment of the team, and team spirit. And they carefully measures aspects of performance to make slight adjustments in flight. Failing to constantly adjust the flight of the team can result in a hyperproductive crash into waterfall performance.

One hour discussion of a comprehensive, yet minimal set of team metrics used in an environment where hyperproductive teams are the norm, along with an Excel spreadsheet that can be used by any Scrum team to improve performance. Velocity, story completion by priority, work in progress, story acceptance rate by product owner, unplanned work, and trending accuracy of estimates all appear to be essential to determine the altitude, velocity, angle of attack, and attitude of a hyperproductive team. Slight adjustment of these parameters on a daily basis keeps the team on target. Half hour questions and discussion on using the Excel spreadsheet to improve team performance.



20 comments:

thesec said...

... the link to the XLS points to wrong dir. Removing "/scrum/" from the link I was able to download the Zip.

fyi

Joyceee said...

I created an account on Agile 2010 and tried to download the Excel spreadsheet and got an error. I would really like to check out the spreadsheet.
Thanks

sam said...

Hi, I tried registering and downloading the spreadsheet. However the link to the spreadsheet seems to be broken ...

Jeff Sutherland said...

The link to the spreadsheet has been updated on the Agile 2010 submission site.

Jeff Sutherland said...

This paper has been accepted for Agile 2010 and the spreadsheet can now be directly downloaded here.

Damiano said...

This spreadsheet is amazing, however I have some difficuilty to use it as a template... is there any tutorial to explain how to use it in detail?

Graham McAnany said...

My understanding is that Product Backlog Items are described as User Stories and are estimated in Story Points, Sprint Backlog Items in hours. Why then, does the Current Sprint Data Entry tab ask for User Stories and Story Points? Seems a bit mixed up? Can someone clarify?

Jeff Sutherland said...

Hyperproductive teams rarely use hours. In fact, in the last year or so, points for task have become best practice for teams I and other Scrum Foundation trainers work with. Hours slow you down and are less accurate than points.

Ignacio Cañon said...

Hi, although I agree with the dificulty of hour estimation technique, I would like you to explain better how you understand the estimation based in points. In any case I think that they should have to do with hours or day portions, because an estimation always consist in how much time one need for achieving a task.
Could it be possible also to get a deep explanation about the great excel sheet you provide in your blog?
I'm new in Scrum and my companie is asking me to study how we could adopt it in our software developmen process.
Thanks and regards.

Ignacio Cañon said...

Hi, although I agree with the dificulty of hour estimation technique, I would like you to explain better how you understand the estimation based in points. In any case I think that they should have to do with hours or day portions, because an estimation always consist in how much time one need for achieving a task.
Could it be possible also to get a deep explanation about the great excel sheet you provide in your blog?
I'm new in Scrum and my companie is asking me to study how we could adopt it in our software developmen process.
Thanks and regards.

Scott Downey said...

Booting a team into effective, points usage that is not tied to time is certainly a skill.

When setting the keystone card, I always ask the Team to list the characteristics of the card they've chosen that made it "easier" than the other cards. The list they provide gives you a checklist of characteristics, the presence or absence of which decrease or increase complexity respectively.

Read up on the Wide Band Delphi technique, created by the Rand Corporation in the 1940s for some more insights on how Points should be applied without time-based references.

Please check out http://rapidscrum.com/resources.php for a video of the Metrics presentation that steps you through the workbook as well. And thanks for your interest in our work!

Scott Downey said...

Ignacio,

Booting a team into timeless units is a skill that is hard to capture in text but I will give you a couple of tips.

When first setting a keystone, we go through the typical exercise and let the Team select the one that they believe represents the "easiest" card. I then interview them to discover a list of characteristics about the card that they have chosen which makes it "easier" than the others. For some reason, if you ask people what makes something "hard" their brains tend to freeze. So I like compiling the initial list this way.

Second, I lead the Team through deep discussions about the first few cards that they estimate together. I listen for things like "It's a five minute job" or "It's just a dozen lines of code", then call them on it. I ask them to refer back to the characteristics of the keystone and explain in those terms why this card is more or less complex.

It takes a while and a lot of practice but I don't ever recall failing to break a Team out of their time-based habits.

For the RoboScrum workbook, please check out http://www.rapidscrum.com/resources.php for some videos. Jeff and I presented the paper again for the cameras for those who missed it at the conference.

Best Regards,
Scott Downey

scrumaster said...

Jeff this spreadsheet is useful however unless I am missing something, the duration of the sprints are only 5 days. can this be adjusted for 10 days or 30 days?

scrumaster said...

Jeff this spreadsheet is useful however unless I am missing something, the duration of the sprints are only 5 days. can this be adjusted for 10 days or 30 days?

Jeff Sutherland said...

Scott has provided the spreadsheet for free for 5 day sprints which he uses for hyperproductive Scrum. To customize this for your needs you would need to communicate with Scott.

Rehan Mustafa Khan said...

Hi Jeff,

We are working on 4 weeks sprint and this excel spread sheet looks like for 1 week sprint. What all changes needs to be done in Sheet so that we can use it in our Sprint.

Thanks & Regards
Rehan Mustafa Khan
Certifed Scrum Master

Leandro Colella Pinter said...

The file seems corrupted when I try opening. Is anyone experiencing this?

Jeff Sutherland said...

The file downloaded and opened OK on my system. However, I have updated the link to direct you to the latest version of the Excel spreadsheet on Scott Downey's site.

Anto said...

I can't open the file either - seems to hang on launch. I'm using LibreOffice though which sometimes finds it hard to interpret complex excel.

Jeff Sutherland said...

Use the latest version of Excel. This is a complex spreadsheet. Scott is not going to support a free spreadsheet for random applications.